The moroccan press

Orange Leads Growth In Moroccan Mobile Market In Q2

Western Sahara Worldnews - Mon, 07/31/2017 - 16:12

Telecompaper

The number of mobile users in Morocco rose by 0.64 percent in the second quarter and was up by 1.48 percent year-on-year to 42.05 million at the end of June, according to the latest figures from the regulator ANRT.

Postpaid continued its growth, up nearly 11 percent from a year ago to almost 3.2 million subscribers, thanks to new low-cost packages launched by all three operators.

Orange showed the strongest growth during the quarter, adding 212,000 new customers for a total 14.30 million. Market leader Maroc Telecom gained 38,000 new customers in the quarter for a total 18.38 million at the end of June, and Inwi finished the period with 9.37 million mobile customers, up by 17,000 from March.

Mobile internet users reached nearly 18 million at the end of June, up 5.7 percent from March or by nearly 1 million new users. Over 12 months, the total grew almost 31 percent of by 4.24 million. Nearly 4.7 million ysed 4G services, an increase of 37 percent from Q1.

Total internet users, including both fixed and mobile, numbered over 19.2 million at the end of Q2, with nearly 1 million added compared to March and an increase of 29 percent year-on-year. ADSL users were up 1 percent from Q1 and 8 percent year-on-year. Internet penetration passed 55 percent of the Moroccan population.

The number of fixed lines continued to fall, down 3.7 percent from a year ago to just over 2 million. Almost 245,000 used limited-mobility services. Average calling minutes fell 5 percent from a year to 118 minute per month in June.

Mobile minutes were also lower, at an average 109 per customer per month compared to 112 a year ago. The regulator said the decline was mainly due to less international traffic. Average revenue per minute was little changed at MAD 0.23 in June for mobile, while fixed revenue rose to MAD 0.98 from 0.95 a year ago.

Mobile data revenue increased 18 percent year-on-year to MAD 20 per customer per month.

What Will It Take to Make the Arab Maghreb Union Work? – Jean R. AbiNader

Morocco on the move - Mon, 07/31/2017 - 15:08

Jean R. AbiNader, MATIC
July 31, 2017

Jean R. AbiNader, Exec. Dir., Moroccan American Trade and Investment Center

The Arab Maghreb Union (AMU) was formed in 1989 by Algeria, Libya, Mauritania, Morocco, and Tunisia as a vehicle to promote economic and political integration among these North African countries. Their good intentions quickly foundered on the domestic and regional conflicts that dominated the next two decades.

Mauritania faced several coup attempts, ending with the election of President Mohamed Ould Abdel Aziz in 2009;  Tunisia was under the control of President Zine El Abidine Ben Ali from 1987 until the Arab Spring revolution of 2011; Libya was ruled by Muammar Gaddafi who was also ousted in the 2011 Arab Spring uprising in his country, and it has not recovered any normalcy since.

Morocco fought off the Polisario Front from 1975-1991, which sought to establish a separate state in the Western Sahara, ending with an uneasy cessation of hostilities in 1991; Morocco and Algeria closed their common border in 1994; Algeria was plunged into a civil war from 1991 to 2002, ending with the election in 1999 of current president Abdelaziz Bouteflika, who came into power promising to end the civil war; and there was a transition in Moroccan leadership from King Hassan II to his son King Mohammed VI in 1999.

In short, only two of the AMU, Morocco and Algeria, have had continuity in leadership; Morocco’s based on a hereditary and immensely popular King as well as successive Parliamentary elections certified as “free and fair”; and Algeria’s through elections that are heavily influenced by the power elite in the country to avoid embarrassing or undesirable outcomes.

The AMU could not establish deep roots in this contentious environment. Despite ongoing meetings among technocrats on economic, financial, and commercial topics, the political milieu is so supercharged with tension that political discussions are next to impossible. In fact, the last heads-of-state meetings planned in 2005 has been postponed indefinitely.

As recently as 2016, Tunisia and Morocco called for recharging the AMU, but to no avail. Progress towards reconciliation and forward movement has been all but doomed by a host of issues: internal economic and political challenges in Algeria and Tunisia; regional security issues fed by domestic unrest and the growing presence of ISIL and al-Qaeda,; competing governments in Libya; and Algerian pressure on Mauritania to take sides on the Western Sahara issue..

An article on Middle East Online raised the familiar question of what could be done to achieve the potential of a working AMU.  A recent report from the World Economic Forum (WEF) criticized the lack of economic progress among the AMU’s member states. “It is crazy that goods need to transit between these neighbors via the French port of Marseilles when they could simply cross by land,” wrote Wadia Ait Hamza, head of Social Engagement – The Americas, in a paper posted of the WEF website.

The paper noted that the Western Sahara issue and the political seesaw in Libya were the two major factors “hampering the union’s economic progress.” With the recent agreement facilitated by France between the two major factions in Libya, that issue may be on its way to resolution through new elections next year, if they can agree on the modalities of a new government. The Western Sahara issue, however, shows no signs of incremental progress; Morocco’s proposal for autonomy under Moroccan sovereignty which has been widely recognized as the appropriate resolution, was introduced a decade ago.

King Mohammed VI, at the African Union (AU) heads of state meeting in February, lamented the demise of the AMU and warned of its inevitable failure if there was no progress. He said, “Today, we regret to see that the Arab Maghreb Union is the least in¬tegrated region in the African con¬tinent, if not in the whole world. Intra-regional trade has reached 10% between ECOWAS [Economic Community of West African States] countries and 19% between SADC [Southern African Development Community] countries, while it is still stagnating at less than 3% be¬tween Maghreb countries.”

It’s not as if the five countries do not have overwhelming incentives to retool their economies and press ahead with economic reforms, despite political stalemates. Declining oil and gas prices have hit Algeria hard, and it is struggling to diversify and rebuild its economic model. Morocco has been growing steadily due to a business-friendly environment and a vision that prioritizes public-private partnerships to drive its manufacturing sector and agro-industry expansion, but it still faces high unemployment numbers.

Libya is still in triage, while Tunisia has the right ingredients but has to overcome Ben Ali era corruption and inefficiencies. Mauritania is moving ahead with its plans but is hampered by dependence on commodities and lack of trained human resources.

In the face of these and other challenges, “The WEF called for the opening of borders between AMU members to ensure the free movement of goods and people.” This would represent a minimal yet very impactful step, allowing for the construction of a long-anticipated highway across the AMU, to be followed by a railroad, both of which would dramatically increase intra-union commerce leading to badly needed job expansion. In addition, it would give impetus to developing economic partnerships based on the complementarity of the countries’ agricultural, industrial, services, and energy sectors.

AMU integration is a critical priority for the region. The benefits of greater economic cooperation, open borders, increased commercial transactions, expanded business enterprises, and shared infrastructure linkages in transportation and energy can only better enable the member countries to meet their many development challenges.

The post What Will It Take to Make the Arab Maghreb Union Work? – Jean R. AbiNader appeared first on Morocco On The Move.

Categories: The moroccan press

Isis Fighters’ Bride Reveals Horror Of Life In The So-Called Caliphate

Western Sahara Worldnews - Mon, 07/31/2017 - 14:14

The Independent.co.uk
Chloe Farand

An Isis fighter’s wife has revealed the horrors of the life of jihadi brides under the so-called caliphate after she was forced into Syria by her husband.

Islam Mitat, 23, a young mother of two said her life was turned around when her husband of three years, Ahmed, forced her to go to live in an Isis bastion in Syria, where he became a jihadi fighter.

Originally from Morocco, Ms Mitat a physics student and keen former fashion blogger, discovered life in “Little Britain” within the caliphate.

Speaking to The Sunday Times from a safe house in northern Syria, she revealed how she set up home with teenage British twins, Zahra and Salma Halane, who ran away from their home in Manchester in 2014.

Liberated from Isis, women burn their burqas and men shave off their beards.

Three schoolgirls from Bethnal Green, east London, Kadiza Sultana Amira Abase and Shamima Begum, also lived in the house, along with other jihadist brides from Bristol and Glasgow.

She also met Sally Jones, the “White Widow” from Kent, a former punk singer and now one of the most wanted female terrorists in the world, she said.

Ms Mitat said the jihadis were delighted to read about themselves in online British news sites and that they “looked happy” about the terrorist attacks in Europe.

Shortly after her arrival in Syria, her husband was killed in the battle of Kobane and a few months later her son Abdullah, now two, was born.

Thousands of British Muslims gather to denounce Isis and call for ‘peaceful caliphate’.

She told the paper that she had met him on a Muslim dating website. He told her they had to go to Turkey because of his work. Instead, she was forced to illegally cross into Syria.

After his death, she was married to a German Afghan fighter who banned her from leaving the house and seeing her friends, dashing her dream of fleeing.

She managed to divorce him but was remarried to an Australian fighter known as Abu Abdallah al-Afghani.

World news in pictures

Despite her situation, encounters with Yazidi sex slaves made her realise her situation could be worse.

Witnessing them being regularly beaten, she said Isis fighters used them as “a bit of fun”. Her attempts to buy freedom for one of them was thwarted when she did not have enough money.

As the caliphate found itself under mounting military pressure, she witnessed the horrors of war first hand.

She said she witnessed mutilated bodies of so called traitors hanging and after an air strike, her street was filled with mutilated bodies.

“It was hard to see someone next to you killed,” she said. “Blood and all of this. It was terrible.”

The 18th Anniversary of the Throne Day.

The moroccan press - Mon, 07/31/2017 - 13:00

HM the King: Morocco is Constantly Developing, However it Witnesses Glaring Paradoxes that Are 'Hard to Understand or Accept'

Morocco is constantly developing, however it witnesses glaring paradoxes that are "hard to understand or accept," said HM King Mohammed VI in His Speech on Saturday to the Nation, on the occasion of the 18th anniversary of the Throne Day.

Categories: The moroccan press

National Economy to Grow by 4.8% in 2017 (Official)

The moroccan press - Mon, 07/31/2017 - 11:47

The national economy is expected to grow by 4.8% in 2017, against 1.2% in 2016, a year marked by an unprecedented drought, the worst ever in over 30 years, said, Thursday in Rabat, minister of Economy and Finance, Mohamed Boussaid.

The minister was presenting before the weekly cabinet meeting a report on the progress in the implementation of the 2017 budget.

Categories: The moroccan press

'The Economist' Deplores Persistence of Barriers Between Algeria, Morocco

The moroccan press - Mon, 07/31/2017 - 11:46

British magazine "The Economist" deplored the persistence of barriers between Algeria and Morocco, as well as the closure of their borders.

In an article published its latest issue, the British weekly said the two neighboring countries would be among the largest economies in the Middle East if the projects of the Arab Maghreb Union (AMU) were implemented.

Categories: The moroccan press

Morocco Calls for International Action to Revive Palestinian-Israeli Political Process

The moroccan press - Mon, 07/31/2017 - 11:44

Minister of Foreign Affairs and International Cooperation, Nasser Bourita, said, on Thursday in Cairo that the dangerous escalation in the Palestinian holy places and territories, following Israeli practices that take advantage of the absence of a political solution to the Palestinian crisis, requires a swift response by the international community to revive the Palestinian-Israeli peace process, through serious new negotiations, on the basis of the two-state solution, the Arab peace initiative and resolutions of international legality.

Categories: The moroccan press

Morocco Seeks To Enhance Trade, Economic Cooperation With Russia

Western Sahara Worldnews - Mon, 07/31/2017 - 03:32

Sputnik international

Morocco is looking into an opportunity to boost trade and economic cooperation to “expand it to the level of the political relations between the two countries.”

Morocco hopes to enhance the trade and economic cooperation with Russia to the same high level of political relations shared by both countries, Moroccan Ambassador to Moscow Abdelkader Lecheheb said Monday.

“We are going to develop our economic exchange in order to expand it to the level of the political relations between the two countries,” the ambassador said at a press conference organized by the Rossiya Segodnya International Information Agency.

Lecheheb pointed out that Rabat welcomed Russian investment in the Moroccan economy. The Moroccan ambassador also expressed hope for enhancing strategic cooperation between the two states.

© REUTERS/ Stringer

Morocco Offers Helping Hand in Mediating Qatar Crisis

“We will do our best to enhance it [strategic cooperation]. In the light of this, we welcome bilateral contacts of our two leaders,” Lecheheb said, referring to the upcoming visit of Russian Prime Minister Dmitry Medvedev to Morocco, set for October.

On July 13, Russian Agriculture Minister Alexander Tkachev met Moroccan Minister of Foreign Affairs and International cooperation Nasser Bourita to discuss bilateral relations. During the talks, Bourita said that Rabat considered the Russian market as a strategic direction for Moroccan economic development and raised the possibility of launching a so-called Green Corridor for agricultural trade.

Morocco Puts Automotive On North Africa’s Map

Western Sahara Worldnews - Sun, 07/30/2017 - 14:13

Automotive News
Douglas A. Bolduc

Before the end of next year, Morocco officials hope to announce the name of a third global automaker to build an assembly plant there. The unnamed manufacturer would launch production in the North African kingdom in 2021 or 2022, according to Khalid Qalam, senior adviser with Invest in Morocco.

That third player would join Renault, which has two factories in Morocco, and PSA Group, which will begin building cars near the coastal city of Kenitra in 2019.

But Morocco has even bigger plans for the industry. The country is working to recruit a fourth major automaker plant before the end of 2021, Qalam says, with production starting in 2023 or 2024. A fourth project would help the country reach its stated goal of having the capacity to build 1 million vehicles a year by 2025.

“At that level, we believe Morocco will rank among the top 15 vehicle-producing countries in the world, and quite possibility even enter the top 10,” Qalam said.

Officials are mindful of the shifting nature of global technologies, he adds. Morocco is encouraging its next vehicle manufacturer to produce a platform that allows it to manufacture both electrified vehicles and conventional models.

Morocco’s pitch to world automakers is that it offers a low-cost base to produce models for export to Europe. But to help make EV production more attractive, Morocco will be providing consumer incentives to get local buyers to consider switching to models that fully or partially run on battery power. By 2025, Morocco wants annual sales of electrified vehicles to rise to 70,000 to 100,000 from small numbers today.

The move to electrified transportation coincides with Morocco’s aim to become a major producer of solar power and to cover half of the country’s energy needs from alternatives such the sun, wind and biomass.

The average wage in Morocco is less than 400 euros ($450) a year, compared to 2,000 euros just across the Mediterranean in Spain. The tax rate on companies is 0 percent for the first five years, and businesses are given a big break on value added tax. The country’s Tangier Med Port is already capable of processing 1 million vehicles a year. In addition, a high-speed rail line between Tangier and Casablanca is set to be operational in 2018.

Morocco: Full Text Of King Mohammed IV Speech On Throne Day

Western Sahara Worldnews - Sun, 07/30/2017 - 13:51

Eurasia Review
by Said Temsamani

On the occasion of the eighteenth anniversary of Throne Day, King Mohammed VI addressed a speech to the nation.

The speech is as follows:

“Praise be to God,

May peace and blessings be upon the Prophet, His Kith and Kin

Dear Citizens,

Today, we are celebrating the eighteenth anniversary of my accession to the throne, in a national environment characterized by achievements as well as challenges.

This yearly celebration is an opportunity to renew the mutual bonds of the Bei’a uniting us and to take stock, together, of the state of the nation.

The development projects and the political and institutional reforms carried out target a single goal: to serve citizens, wherever they may be. There is no difference between north and south, east and west, urban and rural areas.

It is true that Morocco’s resources are limited. It is also a fact that many regions need more basic social services.

However, Morocco has been constantly developing, by the grace of the Almighty. Progress is clear and real; it is recognized across the board and in all sectors.

Today, however, we are witnessing glaring paradoxes that are hard to understand or accept.

On the one hand, Morocco enjoys indisputable credibility at continental and international levels, the esteem and consideration of our partners and the confidence of major investors, such as the Boeing, Renault and Peugeot groups. But on the other hand, we are shocked by the end results, the facts on the ground and the modest achievements made in certain social sectors, so much so that it is shameful to admit we are actually talking about present-day Morocco.

While it is true that our action, through a number of sectoral plans – like those relating to agriculture, industry and renewable energy – has been successful, human and local development programs, which have a positive impact on citizens’ living conditions, do us no credit, nor do they match our ambitions.

In many sectors, this is mostly due to the inadequacy of joint action, the lack of a national, strategic dimension, inconsistency instead of harmony, disparagement and procrastination instead of entrepreneurship and concrete action.

These paradoxes are even more acute when we compare the private sector – which is efficient and competitive, and which is built on a governance model that has incentives, as well as follow-up and monitoring mechanisms – to the public sector, particularly our civil service, which is suffering from poor governance and weak performance.

The private sector is attracting the best human resources that are trained in our country. They are involved in the management of major international groups in Morocco as well as small and medium-sized Moroccan enterprises.

As for civil servants, many of them do not have the skills, qualifications or ambition required; moreover, they are not always guided by a sense of responsibility.

Some of them report to work for only short periods of time, preferring to settle for modest – but guaranteed – pay, instead of working hard to improve their social conditions.

One of the problems which impede Morocco’s progress is the weakness of the civil service, be it in terms of governance, efficiency or the quality of the services provided to citizens.

For instance, the regional investment centers – with the exception of one or two – are a problem. They impede the act of investing instead of serving as a mechanism that provides incentives and resolves the problems of investors at the regional level, without their having to go to central government departments.

This has an adverse impact on regions that are suffering from insufficient – sometimes inexistent – private investment and from the public sector’s weak performance. This, in turn, affects citizens’ living conditions.

The challenge is even more daunting in regions with the biggest shortage of health, education and cultural services, not to mention the lack of jobs. Greater cooperative efforts are required to close gaps and help these regions catch up with the others.

Conversely, regions with a vibrant private sector, like Casablanca, Rabat, Marrakech and Tangier, are enjoying strong economic dynamism which creates wealth as well as jobs.

To put an end to this situation, governors, caids, directors, staff members, local officials, etc. should work hard, just like staff in the private sector – or even harder. They should show a sense of responsibility that does credit to the civil service and yields concrete results since these officials are entrusted with serving citizens’ interests.

Dear Citizens,

All in all, our development policy choices remain sound. The problem lies with mentalities that have not evolved as well as with the inability to implement projects and to innovate.

The evolution witnessed in Morocco in the political domain and in the area of development has not led to the kind of positive reaction you would expect from political parties, leaders and government officials when dealing with the real aspirations and concerns of Moroccans.

When results are positive, political parties, politicians and officials vie for the spotlight to derive benefits from the achievements made, both politically and in terms of media exposure.

However, when matters do not turn out the way they should, they hide behind the Royal Palace and ascribe everything to it.

As a result, citizens complain to the King about government services or officials that take too long to respond to their queries or process their cases, asking him to intercede on their behalf.

Citizens are entitled to convincing answers – within reasonable time frames – to their queries and complaints, including the explanation or justification of negative decisions. Requests and queries should not be turned down without a valid legal reason; they should be rejected only when they are inconsistent with the law, or when the citizen concerned has not completed the relevant procedures or met the requirements.

Given this situation, citizens are entitled to ask themselves: What is the use of having institutions, holding elections, forming governments and appointing ministers, walis, governors, ambassadors and consuls if they live on one planet, and the people and their concerns are on another one?

The practices of some elected officials induce a number of citizens, especially young people, to shun political life and take no part in elections.

Put simply, they do not trust politicians; indeed, some stakeholders have perverted politics, diverting it away from its lofty objectives.

If the King of Morocco is not convinced of the way political activity is conducted and if he does not trust a number of politicians, what are the citizens left with?

To all those concerned I say: ‘Enough is enough!’ Fear God in what you are perpetrating against your homeland. Either discharge your obligations fully or withdraw from public life. There are plenty of honest men and women in Morocco.

This situation can no longer be tolerated because the homeland’s interests and those of the citizens are at stake. I am choosing my words carefully here, and I know what I am saying because it comes after deep reflection.

Dear Citizens,

The responsibility and the privilege of serving citizens call for action that goes from responding to their basic demands to implementing projects – big and small.

As I always point out, there is no difference between small and large projects. All projects are meant to meet people’s needs.

Whether a project concerns a district, a hamlet, a city, a region or the entire country, it still has the same objective, which is to serve citizens. In the eyes of citizens, digging a well or building a dam, for instance, are equally important.

What is the meaning of responsibility if the official concerned loses sight of one of the most basic requirements of that responsibility, which is to listen to citizens’ concerns?

I fail to understand how officials who do not fulfill their duties can leave home, drive their cars, stop at traffic lights and brazenly and shamelessly look people in the face, knowing that they are aware of their unscrupulous conduct.

Are these people who took the oath before God, the homeland and the King, and who fail to perform their duties, not ashamed of themselves? Should not any official who is guilty of dereliction of duty be held to account and dismissed?

I must insist, in this respect, on the need to apply rigorously the provisions of the second paragraph of Article 1 of the Constitution, which links public office with accountability.

It is high time this principle were implemented in full. Just as the law applies equally to all citizens, it must be applied, first and foremost, to all officials, without distinction or discrimination, and in all of the Kingdom’s regions.

This is the dawn of a new era in which there is no difference between officials and citizens as far as civic rights and obligations are concerned; nor is there room for shirking responsibility or avoiding sanctions.

Dear Citizens,

I insist on the need to implement the provisions of the Constitution fully and rigorously. This is a collective responsibility which lies with all stakeholders, each in their respective area of competence – the government, parliament, political parties and all the institutions concerned.

When an official obstructs or delays the implementation of a development project or a social program, this is not simply a case of dereliction of duty; it amounts to treason because that official is harming the interests of citizens and preventing them from enjoying their legitimate rights.

Strangely enough, there are some officials who fail in their duty and still consider that they deserve a higher position.

It is attitudes and inconsistencies such as these that give substance to the widely-held belief among most Moroccans that the reason behind vying for positions is to benefit from rent-seeking and to wield power and influence to serve one’s own interests.

And since examples of such practices exist in everyday life, people unfortunately tend to give credence to this belief.

But, thank God, not all politicians and senior civil servants are like that. There are trustworthy people who genuinely love their homeland and who are known for their integrity, uprightness and commitment to serving the public good.

Dear Citizens,

The events taking place in some parts of the country have regrettably revealed an unprecedented lack of the sense of responsibility.

Instead of each party fulfilling its national and professional obligations; instead of resorting to cooperation and collaborative efforts to resolve citizens’ problems, the parties concerned have been laying the blame at one another’s door, and narrow politicking has been allowed to take precedence over the homeland. As a result, citizens’ interests have been ignored.

Some political parties believe that all they have to do is hold their general meetings, those of their political and executive committees and get involved in election campaigns.

But when it comes to engaging the citizens and solving their problems, they do nothing and are non-existent. This is unacceptable on the part of institutions whose role is to guide and represent the citizens and to serve their interests.

I never expected partisan bickering and political score-settling to go as far as to jeopardize the interests of citizens.

Running public affairs should have nothing to do with personal or partisan interests, populist discourse, or the use of strange expressions that undermine political action.

I have noted that most stakeholders have opted for a win-lose rationale to preserve or expand their political capital at the expense of the homeland, even if that means making the situation worse.

The fact that political parties and their representatives refrain from performing their mission – sometimes deliberately, and sometimes out of a lack of credibility or patriotism – has further compounded the situation.

Given this regrettable and dangerous vacuum, law enforcement services have found themselves face to face with the citizens. They have bravely and patiently fulfilled their duty, showing restraint and commitment to the rule of law as they maintained security and stability.

I am referring to Al Hoceima, but what happened there could actually occur in any other region.

This refutes what some have referred to as the ‘security approach’, as if Morocco were sitting on top of a volcano, or as if each household and each citizen were being watched over by a policeman.

Some even say there is a radical wing and a moderate one, adding that they disagree on how to tackle these events. Nothing could be further from the truth!

In reality, there is only one policy and a single, unwavering commitment, which is to enforce the law, respect the institutions, ensure the security of citizens and safeguard their property.

Moroccans know that the people behind the aforementioned anachronous theory are using it as a business undertaking; they also realize that what these people say is not credible.

They act as if law-enforcement services are the ones who run the country and control the government and senior officials. It is probably these services that set prices, etc.

By contrast, law enforcement officers are making major sacrifices, working day and night in difficult conditions to fulfill their duty, maintain the internal and external security and stability of the homeland, and safeguard the security, serenity and tranquility of citizens.

Moroccans have every right and ought, in fact, to be proud of their law-enforcement authorities. I say this loud and clear, without any inferiority complex: if certain nihilists do not want to admit this, or refuse to tell the truth, it is their problem – and theirs alone.

Dear Citizens,

The Moroccan institutional model is an advanced political system.

Nevertheless, for the most part, it is not properly applied. The problem concerns actual implementation on the ground. Having said that, I am particularly keen to respect the prerogatives of institutions as well as the separation of powers.

However, if officials fail to discharge their duties, and the interests of the homeland and of citizens are jeopardized, it is incumbent upon me, as per the Constitution, to ensure the country’s security and stability and to safeguard people’s interests as well as their rights and freedoms.

At the same time, I will not accept any backtracking on democratic achievements, nor will I tolerate any obstruction as far as the work of institutions is concerned. Both the Constitution and the law are quite clear, and powers need no explanation.

Officials must exercise their prerogatives without waiting for someone’s permission. And instead of repeating the same excuse – namely ‘I am being prevented from doing my job’ – it is better for them to offer their resignation, which nobody would reject.

Morocco must come first: before political parties, before elections and before senior positions.

Dear Citizens,

Until my very last breath, I will always take pride in serving you, for I was brought up to love our motherland and to serve its sons and daughters.

I solemnly promise, before God, to keep up my earnest endeavors and seek to meet your expectations so that your aspirations may be fulfilled.

Allow me, Dear citizens, to speak my mind and tell you exactly how I feel, eighteen years after assuming the sacred mission of leading the nation.

I cannot hide certain matters from you. You know them quite well. It is my duty to tell you the truth. Otherwise, I will let you down.

You will notice, Dear Citizens, that I have not talked about our territorial integrity, Africa, or any other foreign policy issue.

Needless to say, the question of the Moroccan Sahara is not open for discussion, and, of course, it remains a top priority.

What I am seeking to achieve today, in all regions of the Kingdom, is a new massîra, or march – a march for the achievement of human and social development; a march for equality and social justice for all Moroccans, because such a major endeavor cannot be carried out in one region and not in the others.

One may come up with the most efficient development model and the best plans and strategies but:

– without a change in mentality;

– without having the best civil servants;

– without the political parties choosing the best elites that are qualified to run public affairs;

– without a sense of responsibility and national commitment; one would not be able to offer all Moroccans the free, dignified life one wants them to have.

I do not want you, Dear Citizens, to think, after listening to this address, that I am being pessimistic.

Far from it! You know that I am a realist. I tell the truth, painful though it may be.

Pessimism is the lack of will, the absence of a forward-looking vision and the inability to see things as they are.

Thank God, our resolve is both firm and sincere, and we also have a clear, long-term vision. We know who we are and where we are heading.

Throughout the centuries, and by the Grace of the Almighty, Morocco has managed to survive countless hardships, thanks to the close, symbiotic relationship between the Throne and the people.

And here we are today, forging ahead and making progress, together, in various sectors. We confidently and resolutely look forward to making more achievements.

Almighty God says:

‘Allah does command you to render back your Trusts to those to whom they are due; and when you judge between man and man, that you judge with justice’.

True is the Word of God.

Waste Separation And Recycling In Morocco

Western Sahara Worldnews - Sat, 07/29/2017 - 13:06

Qantara.de germany
By Alexander Göbel in Rabat

Morocco’s recycling pioneers

Morocco is exemplary in North Africa for its role in promoting the use of renewable energy such as wind and solar power. However, just like its neighbours, the country has a major problem with waste. A co-operative based just outside the capital has set out to change things.

Yassine Mazzout smiles sheepishly as he gets out of the car. The sweetish, acrid stench is amplified still more by the summer heat, but he doesn’t mind. He grew up here in Akreuch, the unofficial refuse dump on the outskirts of Rabat. He toiled here for more than eight years, vying with hundreds of others for every piece of rubbish that could somehow be sold for reuse. They call them “chiffonniers”: men, women and children who live from rubbish, putting their health at risk.

They live either directly on the dump site, rummaging through the refuse all day long in search of something of value, or they take to the streets at night with pushcarts, picking recyclable items out of rubbish bins.

Yassine points out three large scars on his forearms. “We worked under very harsh conditions. Many people poisoned or injured themselves digging through the rubbish. One girl died before my eyes, run over by a bin lorry. Another lost three fingers. Nothing much happened to me, thank God. But there is one thing I can tell you: many risked their limbs – or their lives – at the dump.”

Morocco’s first recycling co-operative

The dumping site in Akreuch has since been closed and filled. Vegetation now grows on top of millions of tons of refuse, but plastic bags and hospital waste still peek through in many places. Iridescent brown slag seeps down into the valley. Yassine Mazzout gets back into the car. It is thanks to him that no one has to labour here anymore.

The rubbish collectors now work a few kilometres down the road, in Oum Azza. This is where a French company off-loads the refuse from Rabat on behalf of the city council. And for the past few years, Mazzout and his former rivals from the dump have devoted themselves to dealing with the influx of waste – more than 500 tonnes a day. With them, he founded the group “Attawafouk”, which means “trust”, on the dumping site. It is the first co-operative for waste recycling in Morocco – and still the only one in the country.

The dumped refuse is shovelled onto a metal conveyor belt and spread evenly over a drum, where biomass is separated from the rest. The residual waste then lands on further conveyer belts, where people stand and sort it further by hand. “We separate out everything we can: cardboard, plastic bottles, foil, metal,” says Yassine Mazzout. “Refuse that is not organic and cannot be recycled can still be used: the cement company next door purchases the rest from us and uses it as a substitute fuel for its production. This way, we increase the percentage of waste that is reused.”

Fair and humane working conditions: “For the first time, all the hard work with the stinking rubbish is worth it. The workers no longer dress in rags but wear gloves and protective clothing and work in regulated six-hour shifts. They get paid a fixed salary, the equivalent of €250 a month, and also have health insurance,” writes Alexander Göbel.   Pictured here: “Attawafouk”, Morocco’s first and only co-operative for waste recycling

“Everyone is equal here”

The French waste disposal company financed the first machines, but the co-operative had to work hard for everything else. Attawafouk stores the sorted material, then interested companies can come and make offers. The members of the co-operative decide together to whom the recyclables should be sold, when and at what price.

“At the informal dumps, it is always the strongest who prevail. Here in the co-operative, everyone is equal. We all earn the same amount and we all have the same value as workers. There’s no exception, even for me as president; I am just another member of the co-operative,” says Mazzout.

Attawafouk currently turns over more than €460,000 per year with recycling. The co-operative has been able to buy a plastic press, a truck for deliveries and a bus to drive staff back and forth from work. “Things used to be so awful,” says Lakbira Makroumi, who now works for the co-operative. “Outside in the dump – in the sun, in the rain, sometimes in the bitter cold. And we never knew how much money we would take home. Everything is much better now.”

For the first time, all the hard work with the stinking rubbish is worth it. The workers no longer dress in rags but wear gloves and protective clothing and work in regulated six-hour shifts. They get paid a fixed salary, the equivalent of €250 a month, and also have health insurance.

Morocco made the fairly revolutionary move last summer of banishing plastic bags from supermarkets. Moreover, the privatised refuse collectors pick up rubbish quite reliably – at least in the cities. But as far as sorting waste is concerned, there’s still plenty of room for improvement. Households just tip everything together into the bin, with the unofficial rubbish gatherers in the cities picking through it all. What remains lands on the dump. A large part of the valuable biomass is contaminated by items such as batteries or hospital waste, making it unusable as compost. Organic waste in turn contaminates the recyclables.

A long way to go

Yassine Mazzout fears that it will take a long time before consumers realise the need to sort their rubbish. This is due to a lack of political will. “There are also still towns in Europe where all the rubbish is mixed together like it is here. We have to find short-term and long-term strategies to deal with this issue,” he says. “We need to raise awareness: from private households to large companies, from the classroom to the politicians. Maybe thirty years from now we will see rubbish being separated at source.”

At any rate, the rubbish heap that the Attawafouk co-operative has to deal with is growing bigger and bigger because no one else is addressing the problem. The World Bank has expressed an interest in the project. A second recycling conveyor belt is scheduled to go into operation in a few weeks.

“I’m proud of what we have accomplished,” says Mustapha Laflifla, a lean man with a friendly face and a big straw hat on his head. He is Yassine’s right-hand man at the co-operative. “We work under fair and humane conditions. And I want more people to be able to work this way. We need more co-operatives like ours. We are the first, but others must follow, and we want to help make that happen. Maybe one day we will have a federation of co-operatives. Then we can put more pressure on policymakers.”

Alexander Göbel
© Deutsche Welle 2017
Translated from the German by Jennifer Taylor

Morocco King Slams Politicians, Officials For Neglect Of Duties

Western Sahara Worldnews - Sat, 07/29/2017 - 12:52

Xinhuanet
Source: Xinhua

Morocco’s King Mohammed VI slammed on Saturday politicians and public officials for neglect of their duties, and failing to meet aspirations of the people.

The king said so in his speech to the nation on the occasion of the 18th anniversary of ascension to the throne.

He warned that the “evolution” in politics and development “has not led to the kind of positive reaction” when dealing with the real aspirations and concerns of Moroccan people.

He affirmed that the development policies remain sound, while the problem lies with lagging mentalities, as well as with the inability in practicing and innovating.

“The practices of some elected officials induce a number of citizens, especially young people, to shun political life,” he deplored.

Referring directly to the alarming situation in Al Hoceima in northern Morocco, the king warned that political parties and their representatives are refraining from their duty, sometimes deliberately, and sometimes out of a lack of credibility or patriotism.

The situation in Al Hoceima has been tense since October 2016, when fish vendor Mouhcine Fikri was crushed to death after climbing into a rubbish lorry to retrieve his swordfish confiscated by police.

The demand for justice for Fikri in the northeastern region has evolved into a major grassroots movement to require greater government investment to create more jobs.

Morocco has not witnessed any protests of this size since the pro-democracy demonstrations during the Arab spring in 2011.

Seized Phosphate Shipment ‘A Tender Situation’

Western Sahara Worldnews - Sat, 07/29/2017 - 12:30

Radio New Zealand

Fertiliser company Ballance Agri-Nutrients could end up buying back a consignment of phosphate from political activists who are on the brink of gaining control of it.

The NM Cherry Blossom was carrying 50,000 tonnes of phosphate rock when it was stopped at Port Elizabeth. Photo: Supplied / M.L. Jacobs MarineTraffic.com

A ship was carrying 55,000 tonnes of phosphate rock to New Zealand when it was stopped at the South African town of Port Elizabeth.

Opponents of the shipment said it had been mined illegally in Western Sahara, a former Spanish colony that was occupied by Morocco in the 1970s.

Independence activists say Morocco’s control is illegal and they cite a European Court ruling that Western Saharan products should not be regarded as Moroccan goods in trade deals.

The Moroccan company that sold the fertiliser has pulled out of a subsequent court hearing, angrily accusing the South African government of piracy.

Ballance Agi Nutrients chief executive Mark Wynne said that meant the fertiliser reverted to the only remaining party to the case, the Western Sahara activists, the Polisario Front, pending settlement of remaining legal details.

“It is really up to Polisario what they do with the cargo,” Mark Wynne said.

“Our understanding is that it is on the market, and it may well end up as our cargo ultimately, but it is certainly in a tender situation at the moment.”

Meanwhile, Ballance Agri Nutrients’ annual report makes clear that the dispute has not cost it anything.

That is despite the stalled ship incurring berthage fees in Port Elizabeth at the rate of $10,000 a day, which are likely to total more than $1m before it is released.

Mr Wynne said most of that cost would be met by insurance and the rest would be payable by the Moroccan company exporting the goods.

Subsequent shipments of phosphate to New Zealand have been routed via Cape Horn to avoid South African jurisdiction.

Morocco Busts 46 Terror Cells Since 2015

Western Sahara Worldnews - Sat, 07/29/2017 - 12:19

Xinhuanet
Source: Xinhua

The Moroccan security services have busted 46 terrorist cells since 2015, including 41 with links to the Islamic State (IS) group, local media reported Friday.

The director of the Central Bureau of Judicial Investigations, Abdelhak Khiame, said the dismantlement of these cells has led to the arrest of 674 suspects, according to le360.ma news site.

There are some 1,664 Moroccans who have joined terror groups abroad, including 950 to 980 who belong to IS, Khiame said.

He added that up to 230 fighters have returned to Morocco from conflicted areas, stressing that the country has adopted strict policy regarding the arrival of the fighters.

Khiame believes that the end of IS group does not mean the end of terrorism, hailing a “very advanced” counterterrorism cooperation with European countries, especially its northern neighbor Spain, while deploring the “absence” of such cooperation with neighboring Algeria despite the alarming situation in Sahel region of northwest Africa.

“Terrorism is an ideology. We would only make an end to terrorism when we end radicalization,” he insisted.

APM Terminals Tangier Celebrates 10 Years In Morocco With The Munich Maersk, The Largest Ship Calling An African Port

Western Sahara Worldnews - Fri, 07/28/2017 - 22:01

PortNews

APM Terminals Tangier welcomed the Munich Maersk, one of the world’s largest container vessels, as it made its maiden call to celebrate the 10th anniversary of the largest and most modern terminal facility in North Africa.

APM Terminals Tangier is one of the most important transfer points of global trade. In addition to handling Moroccan import and export cargo, the terminal manages and transfers cargo for onward destinations in Africa, Latin America and beyond. Tangier’s strategic location and state of the art facilities provides easy accessibility to cargo vessels sailing between the Atlantic Ocean and Mediterranean Sea.

The Munich Maersk is one of the largest vessels in the Maersk Line fleet, and second in a series of Maersk Line’s improved Triple-E class. With capacity to hold 20,000 containers, the vessel is the largest container ship to call a port in Africa as part of a regular rotation.

“We are delighted to welcome this latest addition to Maersk Line’s fleet in Tangier, just as we celebrate 10th anniversary of our operations. This is yet another confirmation of the strategic importance of APM Terminals Tangier as not only the gateway to Morocco, but as a leading transhipment hub in the region”, says Hicham El Alami, Chief Operating Officer at APM Terminals Tangier.

Since starting operations in July 2007, APM Terminals Tangier volume has grown 72%, to handle more than 1.7 million containers per year. The terminal operates at highest levels of energy efficiency and has reduced its CO2 emissions by 30% since 2009.

To ensure future competitiveness, the terminal recently acquired two super post Panamax cranes, to serve giant vessels like the Munich Maersk. This brings the total number of cranes in operation at the terminal to ten. Investments in elevating more cranes to serve even larger vessels in the future are underway, which will further cement Morocco’s place as an important orchestrator of global trade.

“With this maiden call of Munich Maersk to Tangier, we have yet another opportunity to celebrate our good cooperation with the city, the port and APM Terminals,” added Marcos Hansen, Maersk Line’s Managing Director in Western Mediterranean. As the latest addition to our modern fleet, this new vessel continues our commitment to serve our customers in 2/3 Morocco and around the world in an even more efficient, environmentally-friendly and sustainable way.”

With a high focus on operational efficiency and safety, APM Terminals Tangier has a strong track record in providing high quality services to customers and has become an employer of choice in the country. Furthermore, the terminal team takes pride in partnering with the community to provide a variety of education, sport and social economic programs.

APM Terminals is a leading global port and cargo inland services provider with a presence in 59 countries providing the world’s most geographically balanced global terminal network with 76 operating port and terminal facilities, five new port facilities under construction, and an inland services network spanning 103 operations at 89 locations in 38 countries. Headquartered in The Hague, Netherlands, the company works with shipping lines, importers/exporters, governments, business leaders and the entire global supply chain to provide solutions that help nations achieve their ambitions and businesses reach their performance goals.

Hotelier Summit To Capitalise On Morocco’s Tourism

Western Sahara Worldnews - Fri, 07/28/2017 - 13:36

Travel Trade Weekly

On the back of Morocco’s flourishing tourism industry, the Hotelier Summit Africa (North) scheduled on October 04 – 06 is set to boost the strategic relationships instrumental for the further development of the country’s multiple sectors.

Contributing to the prosperity of hospitality and construction industries, Moroccan tourism experienced significant growth this year, recording higher tourist arrivals from traditional and emerging markets.

In February, the country registered a 92 percent leap in Chinese visitors over 2016’s figure, with Russia, Japan and the US also soaring, up 82 percent, 62 percent and 32 percent, respectively.

Ravi Kumar Chandran, director, Hotelier Summit Africa (North), IDE, commented, “[…] Overall, the summit will serve as a strategic platform to help deliver growth, competitiveness and innovation in the hospitality and real estate industry [in Morocco].”

APM Terminals Tangier Celebrates 10 Years In Morocco

Western Sahara Worldnews - Fri, 07/28/2017 - 13:30

Marine Link
By Aiswarya Lakshmi
Photo: Maersk Line

APM Terminals Tangier welcomed the Munich Maersk, one of the world’s largest container vessels, as it made its maiden call to celebrate the 10th anniversary of the largest and most modern terminal facility in North Africa.

APM Terminals Tangier is one of the most important transfer points of global trade. In addition to handling Moroccan import and export cargo, the terminal manages and transfers cargo for onward destinations in Africa, Latin America and beyond.

Tangier’s strategic location and state of the art facilities provides easy accessibility to cargo vessels sailing between the Atlantic Ocean and Mediterranean Sea.

The Munich Maersk is one of the largest vessels in the Maersk Line fleet, and second in a series of Maersk Line’s improved Triple-E class. With capacity to hold 20,000 containers, the vessel is the largest container ship to call a port in Africa as part of a regular rotation.

“We are delighted to welcome this latest addition to Maersk Line’s fleet in Tangier, just as we celebrate 10th anniversary of our operations. This is yet another confirmation of the strategic importance of APM Terminals Tangier as not only the gateway to Morocco, but as a leading transhipment hub in the region”, says Hicham El Alami, Chief Operating Officer at APM Terminals Tangier.

Since starting operations in July 2007, APM Terminals Tangier volume has grown 72%, to handle more than 1.7 million containers per year. The terminal operates at highest levels of energy efficiency and has reduced its CO2 emissions by 30% since 2009.

To ensure future competitiveness, the terminal recently acquired two super post Panamax cranes, to serve giant vessels like the Munich Maersk. This brings the total number of cranes in operation at the terminal to ten. Investments in elevating more cranes to serve even larger vessels in the future are underway, which will further cement Morocco’s place as an important orchestrator of global trade.

“With this maiden call of Munich Maersk to Tangier, we have yet another opportunity to celebrate our good cooperation with the city, the port and APM Terminals,” added Marcos Hansen, Maersk Line’s Managing Director in Western Mediterranean. As the latest addition to our modern fleet, this new vessel continues our commitment to serve our customers in 2/3 Morocco and around the world in an even more efficient, environmentally-friendly and sustainable way.”

With a high focus on operational efficiency and safety, APM Terminals Tangier has a strong track record in providing high quality services to customers and has become an employer of choice in the country. Furthermore, the terminal team takes pride in partnering with the community to provide a variety of education, sport and social economic programs.

Morocco Makes Women Eligible For Muslim Notary Positions

Western Sahara Worldnews - Fri, 07/28/2017 - 03:40

ANSAmed

The ‘adoul’ profession, a sort of notary for judges in Muslim court systems, can be held by women and not only men in Morocco now.

”Eyes and ears of the judge” is the theological definition for the role normally reserved for men that lightens the work of notaries and judges in the administrative, civil and criminal justice systems. Every deed they write needs a judge to sign it to make it valid.

Due to customs, trust and accessibility – especially in small towns – ‘adouls’ are often used for real estate sales, inheritance laws and to record witness statements included in official trial documents. The justice ministry has now launched a public competition for October for 700 ‘adoul’ positions that women can take part in.

The competition is regulated by Law 16.03, which in at least its first draft in 1982 named ‘being a male’ as one of the requisites in Article 4.

The Article was amended a few years ago but no competition had until now opened to women as well. (ANSAmed).

Bitcoin Store $5 Mln Fraud ‘Operator’ Haddow Falls To Police In Morocco

Western Sahara Worldnews - Fri, 07/28/2017 - 03:32

Coin Telegraph
By William Suberg

“Clandestine” businessman Renwick Haddow is in police custody as the US moves to arrest another Bitcoin bad actor.

Multiple sources including the UK’s Daily Mail report that Haddow, who allegedly conned investors out of $5 mln via a fake exchange platform, was found in the Moroccan capital Tangiers.

“Haddow created two trendy companies and misled investors into believing that highly-qualified executives were leading them to quick profitability,” the US Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC) commented after charging Haddow last month with securities fraud.

The British-born New York resident is said to have tricked investors who contributed funds to his Bitcoin Store platform and other ventures, diverting funds to offshore accounts.

“In reality, Haddow controlled the companies from behind the scenes and they were far from profitable,” the SEC’s New York Regional Office director Andrew M. Calamari added.

Cointelegraph previously reported on Haddow’s original arrest earlier this month, and Moroccan authorities are now set to consider his extradition.

It is a second high-profile Bitcoin case to surface involving the SEC this week, with the regulator also seeking $110 mln in anti-money laundering fines against Russian exchange BTC-e.

Its assumed founder, Alexander Vinnik, is also under pressure to pay a personal fine of $12 mln.

Morocco And Algeria Keep Building More Barriers

Western Sahara Worldnews - Fri, 07/28/2017 - 03:01

The Economist
Middle East & Africa
Marsa Ben Mhidi

Fences make neighbours poorer.

Had Algeria and Morocco honoured their agreement back in 1989 to form an economic union, along with Tunisia, Libya and Mauritania, they would be among the Middle East’s largest economies. Their poor border regions would be booming crossroads. Over the decade to 2015, reckons the World Bank, their two economies would each have almost have doubled in size.

Instead, Algeria grew only by 33% and Morocco by 37%, as both governments instead reinforced their barricades. Their north-west corner of Africa remains “the most separated region on the continent”, says Adel Hamaizia, an Algerian economist. While sub-Saharan countries agree common currencies and trade zones, Algeria digs deeper ditches. Morocco revamps its berms and renews its razor wire. Concrete walls rise on both sides. Frustrated families shout greetings across the divide. Tantalisingly, both have built hundreds of kilometres of east-west highways which stop short of their common border.

Islamic empires once spanned the Maghreb, the land of the setting sun, as Arabs term north-western Africa. Both countries share a common history, cuisine, architecture, strand of Islam and an Arabic dialect mashed with Berber and French. But in 1957 colonial French generals erected an electrified barrier, the Morice Line, along the border to keep out arms-traffickers and guerrillas based in newly independent Morocco. Bar five paltry years in between, the border has been closed ever since. In 1963 the two countries fought a brief war. Skirmishes are now rare, but fighting words are common. Algerian republicans deride Morocco’s monarch as feudal, and because of the kingdom’s land-grab of Western Sahara call him the world’s last colonial ruler. Their neighbours cannot help sniggering at Algeria’s latest prime minister, whose name, Tebboune, is Moroccan slang for “vagina”.

Their prospects should be brighter. Both countries have largely avoided the upheavals of the Arab spring. They are almost homogeneously Sunni, free of the region’s sectarian divides. They have the advantage of cheap labour, and offer Europe a bridge to Africa. Algeria has had the edge. It produces copious oil and gas. And it developed a programme of mass industrialisation and agrarian reform after independence, while King Hassan II, who died in 1999, preserved his ancient kingdom like a museum. Algerians spend twice as long in school as Moroccans, and with so much oil, they earn almost twice as much.

Yet Morocco is catching up fast, thanks to its greater economic openness under Hassan’s son, Muhammad VI. The kingdom ranks 68th on the World Bank’s measure for ease of doing business—88 places above Algeria. Exporting goods from Algeria takes six times as long as from Morocco, and costs almost four times as much. Algerian businessmen complain that centralisation, corruption and red tape have crushed local production. Investment is deterred by a law that limits foreign shareholders to 49% of any concern. Look at Renault, they say. Its production line in Tangiers, in Northern Morocco, is the largest car manufacturer in Africa to be sourced from locally made parts. But its plant in Oran, Algeria’s second city, is little more than an assembly line. Algeria’s beaches can rival Morocco’s for beauty. The coves at Marsa ben Mhidi next to its sandbank with Morocco are enchanting. But tourism on its coast remains state-run and spartan, while Morocco’s are considered some of Europe’s premier escapes.

The time was when smuggling at least provided Algerians near the border with a living. Trucks and donkeys hauled subsidised basics like fuel, flour and sugar to Morocco, and returned with hashish from Morocco’s mountainous Rif. But the latest fortifications have put paid to that. Young men who once plied the routes now fill the mosques with their frustration. Unfinished villas line the roads, abandoned. Officials say the new defences will keep out the drug barons and the risk of a spillover of Morocco’s growing Berber unrest. But locals suspect that at a time of falling oil revenues, the army is simply diversifying its revenues by hogging the smugglers’ take. For $80, they say, soldiers will open the gates of army border crossings at night to those without papers.

For five brief years it was all so different. In 1989 both countries removed visa controls as part of a new Maghreb Arab Union. Trade moved freely. Algerians went west on holiday. The two countries parked their squabble over Western Sahara. Then in 1994 a bomb went off in Marrakesh, and King Hassan, nervous that the civil war in Algeria was heading his way, accused Algeria of involvement and chased out its nationals. Algeria’s generals responded by closing their borders, battening down the edges, and retreating into huffy isolation. As with the Gulf Co-operation Council, another trading bloc that has failed to deliver at the other end of the Arab world, practice rarely matches fraternal ideals.

This article appeared in the Middle East and Africa section of the print edition under the headline “Open Sesame”.

Pages