The moroccan press

Gdeim Izik: the procedure followed has provided all the guarantees of a fair trial

The moroccan press - Fri, 10/20/2017 - 14:23

The procedure followed in the case of Gdeim Izik has provided all the guarantees of a fair trial, in particular article 10 of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights, French observers of the Paris-based Association for the Promotion of Fundamental Freedoms (APLF) said Thursday.

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IOM Director-General Hails Morocco's "Humanist” Policy on Immigration

The moroccan press - Fri, 10/20/2017 - 13:43

Director General of the International Organization for Migration (IOM), William Lacy Swing, hailed on Thursday in Skhirat (Rabat outskirts) Morocco’s "humanist and exemplary policy at the regional and continental levels" on migration and asylum under the high patronage of HM King Mohammed VI.

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Gdeim Izik: the procedure followed has provided all the guarantees of a fair trial

The moroccan press - Thu, 10/19/2017 - 17:11

The procedure followed in the case of Gdeim Izik has provided all the guarantees of a fair trial, in particular article 10 of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights, French observers of the Paris-based Association for the Promotion of Fundamental Freedoms (APLF) said Thursday.

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Financial Times Underlines Relevance of Moroccan Imam Training Initiative

The moroccan press - Thu, 10/19/2017 - 14:07

 The Financial Times highlighted the relevance of the Moroccan initiative to train imams to counter radicalization and promote the values of a moderate, open, and tolerant Islam.

In its latest issue on the Moroccan counterterrorism strategy, the paper underlined that Morocco is offering to train imams who preach in mosques across Europe in an effort to encourage the spread of its moderate Malki doctrine and pre-empt the radicalisation of Muslim minorities living on the continent.

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Morocco-USA Joint Committee in Charge of Following up FTA Meets in Washington

The moroccan press - Thu, 10/19/2017 - 14:01

The 5th Session of the joint committee in charge of following up the Free Trade Agreement (FTA) between the Kingdom of Morocco and the United States of America was held, Wednesday in Washington, under the co-chairmanship of the Secretary of state for Foreign Affairs and International Cooperation, Mounia Boucetta, the Secretary of State in charge of Foreign Trade, Rakiya Eddarhem, and the US assistant trade representative for Europe and the Middle East, Daniel Mullaney.

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Over 8 Million Tourists Visited Morocco at End-August 2017

The moroccan press - Thu, 10/19/2017 - 13:58

A total of 8 million tourists visited Morocco between January and August 2017, up 10.4% compared to the same period a year earlier, according to the Tourism observatory.

The number of foreign tourists grew by 13.1%, while arrivals of Moroccans living abroad (MRE) increased by 8.1%, said the observatory in a report on national tourism statistics for the month of August, published recently.

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UN Hails Moroccan Presidency of COP22

The moroccan press - Thu, 10/19/2017 - 13:55

The executive secretary of the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC), Patricia Espinosa, hailed, Wednesday in Nadi (north-western Fiji) , the Moroccan "great" presidency of COP22, which took place in Marrakech in November 2016.

"The Moroccan presidency was great," she told MAP on the sidelines of Pre-COP23 (Oct.17-18), expressing her appreciation and gratitude to the Kingdom for the "extraordinary" support given to Fiji in order to advance the climate change agenda.

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Morocco, Chad For Strengthening Social Housing Partnership

The moroccan press - Thu, 10/19/2017 - 12:50

The Moroccan and Chadian Ministries of territory development signed, Wednesday in Rabat, a partnership agreement to develop social housing.

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Cabinet Meeting Adopts 2018 Finance Bill

The moroccan press - Thu, 10/19/2017 - 12:14

The cabinet meeting, held Tuesday in Rabat under the chairmanship of head of Government, Saad-Eddine El Othmani, adopted the 2018 Finance Bill, which aims to achieve a growth rate of 3.2% and plans to contain the budget deficit at 3%.

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Why the King Continues His Call for Reform, Accountability, Adaptability, and Progress in Educating Youth – Jean R. AbiNader

Morocco on the move - Wed, 10/18/2017 - 21:31

Jean R. AbiNader, MATIC
October 18, 2017

Jean R. AbiNader, Exec. Dir., Moroccan American Trade and Investment Center

The King of Morocco, Mohammed VI, has a problem: during the past year he has made remarkable speeches calling for a renewed spirit of dedication to public service by government officials at all levels; and he has redoubled efforts to improve social services, particularly those preparing young people for the world’s competitive marketplace.  Yet, the feedback he is hearing from his people is that intentions are outpacing results and needs are unmet at many levels, including providing services, reducing corruption, improving the educational system.

With this in mind, the King addressed the opening of Morocco’s legislative bodies last week and made his dissatisfaction clear. He began by noting that the beginning of the legislative sessions was “the beginning of a crucial stage in which the holding of public office is linked with accountability, and during which appropriate answers and solutions to citizens’ pressing problems and issues must be found.”

Although he has made this position clear, most recently in his speech on Throne Day, he is clearly not pleased with the lack of follow-through by officials. “I do not criticize just for the sake of criticizing, nor do I let matters go unattended. What I want is for the situation to be addressed, mistakes corrected and shortcomings remedied.” It is a powerful statement calling for specific actions.

In his speech, King Mohammed VI addressed key issues such as regionalization, judicial reform, and government accountability, along with recommendations for accelerating and improving implementation. What is of specific interest is that the King is especially attentive to the needs of the people, “Moroccans today need balanced, equitable development which ensures dignity for all, guarantees income, provides jobs – especially for our young people – and contributes to building confidence, promoting stability, and ensuring integration into professional, social and family life, a goal to which all citizens aspire.”

In order to provide young people with the means to build their futures, the King emphasized the importance of improving education. “Today, Moroccans want a good education for their children – one that does not simply stop at reading and writing. They want an education that guarantees integration into the knowledge and communication-based world; an education that gives access to the job market and contributes to individual and collective advancement, instead of producing large numbers of unemployed people.”

According to the government’s own statistics, Morocco has made impressive gains in job creation, largely in the industrial manufacturing sectors. But youth unemployment, especially among university graduates, is as high as 20%, while many others are in the informal sector or low wage, non-career employment. The World Bank and others have recommended that to build a workforce that is competitive, promotes enterprise and entrepreneurship initiatives, and responds to the market, significant progress must be made in educational reform. This means that the entire sector, from administration and curricula to modern facilities and equipment and competent teachers, to engaging technical and vocational training, must be mobilized in a decade-long program with well-defined and adaptable objectives.

The King stressed that the future is now for students. “As a matter of fact, societal developments in Morocco have made young people important new players with a significant impact on public life. Despite the efforts made, I do not consider the situation of our youths to be heartwarming – and neither do they.  Indeed, many young Moroccans are suffering from exclusion and unemployment; many have dropped out of school and many are even deprived of basic social services. The education and training system does not fulfill its role in terms of training young people and ensuring their integration into society.”

He went on further to note that “Given the close link between youth issues, economic growth investment and employment, addressing the concerns of young people requires innovative action and concrete projects that unlock their potential, provide them with jobs and a steady income, offer them stability and enable them to contribute effectively to their country’s development.”

In his final comments on education, the King said, “I call for the development of a new integrated youth policy…that would be based primarily on training and employment. It should be effective in terms of finding realistic solutions to the actual problems plaguing our youths, especially in rural areas and poor suburban neighborhoods.” To ensure that actions will follow intentions, he noted “As part of the measures to develop and adopt that policy, I call for the Advisory Council for Youth and Community Action to be rapidly set up as a constitutional institution and as a forum for discussion, for expressing views and for monitoring youth affairs.”

The King knows that such a Council will be able to shine a light on the rate of achievement in government educational strategies and make recommendations for progress. It is time for results from the many investments made by the government in education, results that come from diligent pursuit of policies, programs, and projects that will enable the youth of Morocco to compete successfully in the world marketplace and build a stronger and more resilient society.

The post Why the King Continues His Call for Reform, Accountability, Adaptability, and Progress in Educating Youth – Jean R. AbiNader appeared first on Morocco On The Move.

Categories: The moroccan press

UN Hails Moroccan Presidency of COP22

The moroccan press - Wed, 10/18/2017 - 16:16

 
The executive secretary of the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC), Patricia Espinosa, hailed, Wednesday in Nadi (north-western Fiji) , the Moroccan "great" presidency of COP22, which took place in Marrakech in November 2016.

"The Moroccan presidency was great," she told MAP on the sidelines of Pre-COP23 (Oct.17-18), expressing her appreciation and gratitude to the Kingdom for the "extraordinary" support given to Fiji in order to advance the climate change agenda.

Categories: The moroccan press

King Mohammed VI Calls for New Development Model

Morocco on the move - Wed, 10/18/2017 - 16:00
Urges rapid implementation of Regionalization to support “bold” initiatives

Washington, DC, October 17, 2017 (MACP) – In his speech at the opening session of Parliament this week, King Mohammed VI called for reconsideration of Morocco’s development model “in order to keep abreast of changes in the country.”

The King noted that, “Although Morocco has made tangible progress, which is recognized throughout the world, we have to admit that our national development model no longer responds to citizens’ growing demands and pressing needs; it has not been able to reduce disparities between segments of the population, correct inter-regional imbalances or achieve social justice.”

He said, “What I want is for the situation to be addressed, mistakes corrected and shortcomings remedied.” To that end, he called for “the full implementation of advanced regionalization to be speeded up because that system provides solutions and fulfils social and development expectations in all of our regions.”

The King announced several new ministerial departments to monitor development progress and called for a “new integrated youth policy – similar to the National Initiative for Human Development – that would be based primarily on training and employment.”

“Moroccans today need balanced, equitable development,” he said, “which ensures dignity for all, guarantees income, provides jobs – especially for our young people – and contributes to building confidence, promoting stability and ensuring integration into professional, social and family life, a goal to which all citizens aspire.” The King urged “objectivity and calling a spade a spade, without flattery or embellishment. I call for innovative, bold solutions, even if that means going into uncharted territory or causing a political earthquake.”

“Since ascending the throne, King Mohammed VI has demonstrated an unwavering commitment to reform,” said former US Ambassador to Morocco Edward M. Gabriel. “He consistently acknowledges problems and seeks the most effective solutions – for the benefit of all Moroccans.”

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 ContactJordan Paul, 202.587.0855

The Moroccan American Center for Policy (MACP) is a non-profit organization whose principal mission is to inform opinion makers, government officials, and interested publics in the United States about political and social developments in Morocco and the role being played by the Kingdom of Morocco in broader strategic developments in North Africa, the Mediterranean, and the Middle East.

This material is distributed by the Moroccan American Center for Policy on behalf of the Government of Morocco. Additional information is available at the Department of Justice in Washington, DC.

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Biz Brief: Morocco Scores High in Africa’s Insurance Market; Morocco Energy to Light Up Africa; GE Senior Official Talks about Morocco; and Moroccan Logistics Company Expands Its Reach – Jean R. AbiNader

Morocco on the move - Wed, 10/18/2017 - 15:14

Jean R. AbiNader, MATIC
October 18, 2017

Jean R. AbiNader, Exec. Dir., Moroccan American Trade and Investment Center

Morocco’s insurance sector expands. In terms of overall performance in Africa, Moroccan companies take second in the volume of premiums issues. Nationally, Wafa Assurance is first in terms of market share.

According to the latest report from Morocco’s Insurance and Social Insurance Supervisory Authority, a Moroccan, in 2016, spent an average of $102.30 a year for insurance, which breaks down into $41.90 for life insurance, and $60.40 for non-life insurance products (car, illness, credit, etc.).

Wafa Assurance has a 21% share of the Moroccan market, followed by Moroccan Royal Insurance at 16.8%, Moroccan Saham at 12.8%, and the French provider Axa at 11.2%. A new entrant, Attamine Chaabi scored high in life insurance with 19.2%, rising from 15th to 5th place in one year.

Wafa, a company of Attijariwafa Bank, placed first in life insurance products (28.3% market share) and second, after Saham, for non-life products. Wafa is also well established in Tunisia, where it has 18% of the market, and has strong operations in Senegal, Cameroon, and Côte d’Ivoire. Worldwide, Morocco, at $3.47 billion in premiums, ranks 49th, behind the UAE and Saudi Arabia in the MENA region; South Africa leads the continent with $42 billion in premiums.

Reflecting the agricultural downturn in 2016, liability claims in 2016 related to crop insurance were up some $84 million, fire and natural causes rose to $19 million, and auto related payouts reached $702 million.

Despite progress, Africa is still in a power deficit, so Morocco’s national energy strategy includes garnering continental and European customers. From its development of extensive solar technology at very low output costs, to environmental and security benefits of controlling production, Morocco has a winning hand for reaching new markets throughout the region.

As an article in Quartz Africa points out, “Even though the continent’s power generating capacity has slowly improved over the years, rationing, rolling shortages, and blackouts continue to hamper many countries’ development — including economic giants like South Africa and Nigeria.”

In addition to poor production, and despite the best intentions of the Power Africa project launched under President Obama, financing for power generation remains intermittent and problematic. “African governments invest about $12 billion a year in the power sector, even though it needs an estimated $33 billion in 2015. By 2040 the African power sector will need $63 billion annually.” The lack of investment, poor power access, high prices, and weak reliability cost African economies an average of 2.1% of GDP.

While this is the case in sub-Saharan Africa, North Africa is investing tens of billions of dollars in renewable energy projects. Solar power projects in Tunisia, Egypt, and Morocco are clearly aimed at satisfying domestic demand and meeting energy targets in Europe, which is reducing the use of nuclear and hydrocarbon energy sources.

A pioneer in building public-private partnerships (PPP) for renewable energy projects, “Morocco has emerged as a global exemplar of going green, banning plastic bags and setting up ambitious goals to crack down on carbon emissions. In 2012, the government also phased out fossil fuel subsidies and shifted its focus to renewables. In 2016, it hosted the United Nations convention on climate change, and also kickstarted a four-year project aimed at using solar panels to generate power, heat water, and provide air-conditioning in hundreds of mosques.”

A GE executive explains why his company is in Morocco for the long term. Anas Kabbaj, Country Executive Morocco, was interviewed by Oxford Business Group (OBG) about his perceptions of doing business, and why Morocco makes sense in GE’s global strategy. He described GE’s extensive involvement in large-scale energy projects with various partners, including the National Office of Electricity and Drinking Water (ONEE), and with private companies such as Nareva, and Royal Air Maroc.

He points out that due to the complexity of large projects, any delays in the timing of financing, logistics, partner participation, and technology inputs can lead to delays that affect the overall project. For example, when GE experiences customs delays, it impacts activities throughout the implementation targets. So, in order for Morocco to become an international logistics hub, it must invest heavily in upgrading its facilities and performance to international standards.

He noted the excellent performance of ONEE and MASEN in using the PPP model to develop capital-intensive energy projects, which are now being coordinated by a single department under MASEN. Kabbaj also said that PPPs represented a viable business model in the healthcare sector, where private expertise and investment are critical.

SJL attracts investment to expand its logistics transport between Europe and Africa. The Moroccan company SJL has found a new partner, AfricInvest, to invest in its five-year expansion plans. AfricInvest specializes in private equity in the African and European markets. This partnership will enable SJL to tap into the Public-Private Investment Fund (SME Growth) to generate new clients and facilities in Africa through both organic growth and acquisitions.

Both partners see benefits to their growth strategies. SJL will continue to build recognition of its expansion in current and future markets while AfricInvest, which currently operates in 25 countries, will continue to expand its network of clients.

The post Biz Brief: Morocco Scores High in Africa’s Insurance Market; Morocco Energy to Light Up Africa; GE Senior Official Talks about Morocco; and Moroccan Logistics Company Expands Its Reach – Jean R. AbiNader appeared first on Morocco On The Move.

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Morocco Has Made Qualitative Leap in Blood Donation in Recent Years

The moroccan press - Tue, 10/17/2017 - 14:15

Morocco has made a qualitative leap in blood donation in recent years, notably after the National Blood Donation Campaign, chaired by HM King Mohammed VI in March 2013, said, Tuesday in Marrakech, Health minister, El Houssaine Louardi.

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Morocco, GB Discuss Means to Strengthen Museum Cooperation

The moroccan press - Tue, 10/17/2017 - 14:13

President of Morocco's Foundation for Museums (FNM), Mehdi Qotbi, held, Monday in London, meetings with heads of British leading museums on the prospects for cooperation between the two countries in this area.

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Morocco's Jouahri Among World's Best Central Bank Governors for 2017

The moroccan press - Tue, 10/17/2017 - 11:03

Governor of Bank Al Maghrib (Morocco’s Central Bank), Abdellatif Jouahri, was granted, Saturday in Washington, the "World’s Best Central Bank Governors for 2017" prize, awarded by US magazine "Global Finance".

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Morocco Takes part in 17th Extraordinary Session of AU Executive Council in Addis Ababa

The moroccan press - Tue, 10/17/2017 - 10:53

Morocco is taking part in the 17th extraordinary session of the executive council of the African Union (AU), which opened Monday in Addis Ababa.

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Full Text of King Mohammed VI’s Speech at Parliament Opening

Morocco on the move - Mon, 10/16/2017 - 17:22

On October 13, 2017, Morocco’s King Mohammed VI addressed the following speech before the members of the Parliament’s two houses (the House of Representatives and the House of Advisors), at the opening of the first session of the second legislative year of the tenth legislature:

“Praise be to God

May peace and blessings be upon the Prophet, His Kith and Kin

Ladies and Gentlemen, Distinguished Members of Parliament,

It is with pride and joy that I address you, once again, as I do every year, on the occasion of the State Opening of Parliament.

This Parliament Session follows on the heels of my State of the Nation Address, in which I mentioned some of the difficulties and shortcomings noticed in our development model, with regard to administrative services, across the board, as well as elected councils and local governments.

However, that critical analysis, which the current situation calls for, is not an end in itself.

In fact, it is the beginning of a crucial stage in which the holding public office is linked with accountability, and during which appropriate answers and solutions to citizens’ pressing problems and issues must be found.

Ladies and Gentlemen, Distinguished Members of Parliament,

I do not criticize just for the sake of criticizing, nor do I let matters go unattended. What I want is for the situation to be addressed, mistakes corrected and shortcomings remedied.

I am paving the way for an effective approach and for a March of a new kind. What I am doing is at the heart of my constitutional powers. It reflects my strong determination to press ahead with the reform process and to lead by example, for those who are in charge of public affairs.

As the guarantor and custodian of the rule of law, and the first person to respect it, I have never hesitated to hold to account anyone who has patently underperformed while carrying out his or her professional or national duties.

However, the situation today commands greater firmness in order to put an end to complacency and to disregard for citizens’ interests.

Ladies and Gentlemen, Distinguished Members of Parliament,

The problems are obvious and the priorities clear. No further diagnosis is required. In fact, the situation has been abundantly analyzed.

On many occasions, we have taken stock of the reality on the ground and of the magnitude of the shortcomings, which all Moroccans are aware of.

Is it not true that good implementation of the development projects that have been planned and launched is what is required? Is it not a fact that we have to find practical, applicable solutions to the real problems, and fulfil the reasonable, legitimate expectations of citizens in the areas of development, education, health, employment and so on?

At the same time, we have to make sure that there is judicious, continuous monitoring of the progress made in the implementation of social and development programs, and that we carry out systematic, impartial assessment throughout the implementation phases.

To this end, I have decided to create a ministerial department, within the Ministry of Foreign Affairs, in charge of African affairs – especially investment – as well as a monitoring unit, both at the Ministry of Interior and the Ministry of Finance.

I also call on the Court of Auditors to monitor and assess the implementation of public projects in all of the Kingdom’s regions.

Moroccans today need balanced, equitable development which ensures dignity for all, guarantees income, provides jobs – especially for our young people – and contributes to building confidence, promoting stability and ensuring integration into professional, social and family life, a goal to which all citizens aspire.

They also want health coverage for all, easy access to quality medical services and their dignity to be preserved.

Today, Moroccans want a good education for their children – one that does not simply stop at reading and writing. They want an education that guarantees integration into the knowledge and communication-based world; an education that gives access to the job market and contributes to individual and collective advancement, instead of producing large numbers of unemployed people.

Moroccans also need a fair and effective judiciary. They want an efficient public service that caters for the needs of citizens and serves public interest; a public service that promotes investment and fosters development, without any form of bribery, cronyism or corruption.

Ladies and Gentlemen, Distinguished Members of Parliament,

Although Morocco has made tangible progress, which is recognized throughout the world, we have to admit that our national development model no longer responds to citizens’ growing demands and pressing needs; it has not been able to reduce disparities between segments of the population, correct inter-regional imbalances or achieve social justice.

In this regard, I call upon the government, Parliament and all the institutions and organs concerned – each in its respective fields of competence – to reconsider our development model in order to keep abreast of changes in the country.

As far as our development model is concerned, I should like to see an integrated vision that gives it fresh momentum, that helps overcome the hurdles impeding its adjustment and that addresses the weaknesses and shortcomings revealed by past practices.

Using a participatory approach similar to the one we adopt on key issues, such as the amendment of the Constitution or advanced regionalization, I call for all national stakeholders, committed actors and the nation’s driving forces to be included in this endeavor.

I also recommend objectivity and calling a spade a spade, without flattery or embellishment. I call for innovative, bold solutions, even if that means going into uncharted territory or causing a political earthquake.

I want this to be a collective national pause to address issues and problems that are troubling Moroccans. I want it to foster awareness of the need to change mindsets that stand in the way of achieving the comprehensive progress to which we aspire.

I am keen to follow up on this matter and look forward to examining the proposals and measures that need to be implemented for this new development model to be produced.

Ladies and Gentlemen, Distinguished Members of Parliament,

Regardless of how thorough and full-fledged it is, a development model will remain limited in scope if it does not comprise effective mechanisms that allow for evolution at local and regional levels.

For this reason, I have been calling for the full implementation of advanced regionalization to be speeded up because that system provides solutions and fulfils social and development expectations in all of our regions.

Regionalization is not just about administrative regulations and procedures. It also involves far-reaching changes in state structures as well as a practical approach to local governance.

This is the most effective way to tackle local problems and respond to the demands of local populations since it involves listening to citizens and including them in decision-making, especially through their representatives in elected councils.

I realize there are no ready-made solutions to the problems encountered in the various regions. However, I insist on the need to ensure that public policies address the concerns of citizens, in the light of the needs and specific features of each region.

To make the management of local public affairs more efficient, I wish to emphasize the need to assign qualified human resources to regions and to provide them with sufficient financial resources, in addition to ensuring the devolution of powers.

In this regard, I ask the government to establish a timetable for completing the implementation of advanced regionalization.

I also urge elected councils, particularly at regional level, to shoulder their responsibility when managing affairs in their regions, and to take action to respond to the needs of local populations and answer their legitimate demands.

I also call for the preparation and adoption of an advanced administrative devolution charter, which I have long been advocating, and for a precise timetable for its implementation to be set.

Ladies and Gentlemen, Distinguished Members of Parliament,

Regrettably, the progress witnessed in Morocco does not benefit all citizens, especially our young people, whom I care deeply about and who account for more than a third of the population.

The proper training of young Moroccans and their active and constructive involvement in public life are among the most important challenges that ought to be met. I have emphasized, many a time, including in my address on 20 August 2012, that young people are our real asset. They need to be seen as the engine of growth, and not an obstacle to it.

As a matter of fact, societal developments in Morocco have made young people important new players with a significant impact on public life.

Despite the efforts made, I do not consider the situation of our youths to be heartwarming – and neither do they.  Indeed, many young Moroccans are suffering from exclusion and unemployment; many have dropped out of school and many are even deprived of basic social services.

The education and training system does not fulfil its role in terms of training young people and ensuring their integration into society.

Although they focus their attention on young people, social and sector-specific public policies have only a limited impact on the situation of young Moroccans because of a lack of efficiency and coordination, and because programs are not suited to all youth groups.

Given the close link between youth issues, economic growth investment and employment, addressing the concerns of young people requires innovative action and concrete projects that unlock their potential, provide them with jobs and a steady income, offer them stability and enable them to contribute effectively to their country’s development.

A case in point is the situation of young people working in the informal sector. Realistic solutions are needed in this regard. They do not necessarily require substantial material resources, and yet they would offer young people the means and opportunities to work legally. Both our young people and society would benefit from this.

I call for the development of a new integrated youth policy – similar to the National Initiative for Human Development – that would be based primarily on training and employment. It should be effective in terms of finding realistic solutions to the actual problems plaguing our youths, especially in rural areas and poor suburban neighborhoods.

To ensure the efficiency and success of this new policy, I recommend that inspiration be drawn from the provisions of the Constitution, that young people be able to voice their concerns, that different intellectual trends be reflected and that the findings of the reports and studies I ordered be built upon, particularly the ones on “Morocco’s overall wealth”, the “Education and Training Vision for 2030″ and so on.

As part of the measures to develop and adopt that policy, I call for the Advisory Council for Youth and Community Action to be rapidly set up as a constitutional institution and as a forum for discussion, for expressing views and for monitoring youth affairs.

Ladies and Gentlemen, Distinguished Members of Parliament,

The shortcomings plaguing the management of public affairs are not inevitable. It is not impossible to overcome them, provided there is a sincere will and good use is made of the means available.

This is a matter that lies with you as members of Parliament, as public servants and as elected officials. You are accountable before God, the people and the King for the situation prevailing in the country.

Therefore, you are expected to engage in national efforts responsibly and in good faith in order to change the situation, without regard for any political or partisan considerations.

This homeland belongs to all Moroccans, and all Moroccan citizens are entitled to benefit from progress and growth.

As I invoke Almighty God’s blessings upon you, I want you to rise to the occasion and discharge your tremendous national duties, for the benefit of the nation and citizens.

Almighty God says: “Then, when you have taken a decision put your trust in Allah. For Allah loves those who put their trust (in Him)”. True is the Word of God.

Wassalamu alaikum warahmatullah wabarakatuh.”

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IINA Turns into OIC federation of News Agencies

The moroccan press - Mon, 10/16/2017 - 14:48

The 5th session of the General Assembly of the International Islamic News Agency (IINA) adopted, on Sunday in Jeddah, a resolution transforming the agency into the Federation of News Agencies of the Organisation of Islamic Cooperation (OIC).

This session, in which Morocco’s news agency (MAP) was represented by its Secretary General, Rachid Boumhil, stressed that this new framework will help defend Islamic issues, particularly the causes of Palestine and Al-Quds Al-Sharif.

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